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$5 ‘Hero Pay’ Now In Effect For Grocery, Drug Store Workers In Unincorporated L.A. County

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Grocery Store Worker COVID-19 Hero Pay
Photo Courtesy of Supervisor Hilda Solis' Office

A $5 per hour “hero pay” went into effect on Friday for grocery and drug store workers in the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County.

On Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 to approve an urgency ordinance to enact a $5 per hour hazard pay, with Supervisor Kathryn Barger voting in opposition. 

Barger cited unintended consequences and a concern that the ordinance only covers a ”small sliver” of the essential workforce during the meeting.

The ordinance applies to companies that employ at least 300 workers nationwide and more than 10 employees per store, according to the L.A. County Department of Consumer and Business Affairs (DCBA).

Workers must work at least two hours in a one-week period physically within a grocery retail or drug retail store in an unincorporated area of the county to receive the new “hero pay,” according to the department.

“While many sectors were able to transition their workforce to working from home, millions of workers in face-to-face service industries were deemed ‘essential’ to ensure that our communities continue to operate, and basic needs continue to be provided,” the motion co-authored by Supervisors Hilda Solis and Holly Mitchel reads. 

The supervisors said frontline grocery and drug retail workers have been met with COVID-19 exposures and outbreaks in their place of work. 

The inability to practice social distancing consistently at work due to large crowds has not only increased exposure risks but also contributed to the psychological distress workers have felt during the pandemic, with research finding that employees with direct customer exposure were five times more likely to test positive with the burden of the crisis affecting the most vulnerable low-income communities, especially low-income workers of color, according to the motion. 

Meanwhile, some of the largest grocery retailers in the nation and county have flourished and expanded their market share, the supervisors argue. 

“These employers employ a labor workforce that consists of low-wage workers who have been disproportionately impacted by the economic fallout of this pandemic, with nearly half of low-wage workers having trouble paying their bills and roughly a third having found these top retailers have seen a 40% increase in profit averaging $16.7 billion in grocery and drug retail workers are among the heroes of this pandemic, putting their lives on the line – often for low wages and minimal benefits- in order to sustain our food system and maintain healthy communities,” the motion reads.

Those in the grocery industry fear measures like this might lead to increased costs to consumers as well as potentially reduced hours for workers. 

“This could increase grocery prices for families in an economic time where many people are struggling,” said Nate Rose, spokesperson for the California Grocers Association (CGA).

The industry association did an economic study on the impact of wage increase ordinances and found the grocery costs for a family of four could increase by hundreds of dollars a year, according to Rose. 

The spokesperson added a one-size-fits-all plan is not feasible and it should be up to each company to enact a hazard pay or bonus for their employees. 

The urgency ordinance is expected to be in effect for 120 days starting on Feb. 26, with an option to extend the order, according to the motion.

To find out if a grocery retail or drug retail store is in unincorporated Los Angeles County, visit the Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder/County Clerk website. 

Coronavirus

California To Require State, Health Care Workers To Show Proof Of Vaccination Or Testing

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COVID19 Vaccine Los Angeles County (1)

All California state employees, as well as workers in health care and high-risk congregate settings, must show proof of full vaccination or be tested at least once per week, Governor Newsom announced Monday.

The new policy for state workers will take effect on Aug. 2 and testing will be phased in over the next few weeks. The new policy for health care workers and congregate facilities is set to take effect on Aug. 9, and health care facilities will have until Aug. 23 to come into full compliance. 

Unvaccinated workers will be subject to at least weekly COVID-19 testing and will be required to wear appropriate personal protection equipment (PPE). This requirement also applies to high-risk congregate settings, including senior residential facilities, homeless shelters and jails. 

“We are now dealing with a pandemic of the unvaccinated, and it’s going to take renewed efforts to protect Californians from the dangerous Delta variant,” said Newsom in a statement. “As the state’s largest employer, we are leading by example and requiring all state and health care workers to show proof of vaccination or be tested regularly, and we are encouraging local governments and businesses to do the same.”

Despite California leading the nation in vaccinations, with more than 44 million doses administered and 75% of the eligible population has received at least one dose, the state is seeing increasing numbers of people who refused to get the vaccine being admitted to the ICU and dying.

“The Delta variant is up to 60% more infectious than the Alpha strain but many times more infectious than the original COVID-19 strain. If you have been waiting to get vaccinated, now is the time,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly in a statement.

As of last week, California’s statewide case rate more than quadrupled from a low in May of 1.9 cases per 100,000 residents a day to at least 9.5 cases per 100,000.

The vast majority of new cases are among the unvaccinated, with 600% higher case rates among the unvaccinated than for those who are vaccinated, according to the state. 

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Los Angeles County COVID-19 Cases Increase 80% In One Week

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COVID-19-Vaccine-Los-Angeles-County

Los Angeles County continues to see a rapid rise in COVID-19 transmission countywide with cases doubling over the last 10 days as the Delta variant spreads.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health confirmed 2,767 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday an 80% increase over last week, according to the department. 

On Friday, 3,058 additional cases were reported, marking the third day in a row with more than 2,500 cases reported in a day, according to Public Health.

The County’s daily average case rate, with a 7-day lag, is now 12.9 cases per 100,000 people, an increase from last week’s rate of 7.1 cases per 100,000.

There are 645 people with COVID-19 currently hospitalized and 22% of these people are in the ICU. Last week, there were 406 people hospitalized with COVID-19 illness.

“Public Health has detailed the rise of the Delta variant among strains sequenced in the Los Angeles County area for weeks,” department officials said. “While emerging data affirms that fully vaccinated people are well protected from severe infections with Delta variants, people with only one vaccine are not as well-protected, and there is increasing evidence that a small number of fully vaccinated individuals can become infected and may be able to infect others.”

From July 11 to July 17, the number of sequenced Delta variants was 201, 84% of all sequences collected that week. 

This is consistent with the rise of Delta nationwide: earlier this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that Delta strains accounted for 83% of circulating COVID-19. Given that about 4 million residents in L.A. County are not yet vaccinated, the risk of increased spread of this variant within L.A. County remains high, according to Public Health.

As of July 18, more than 10,845,531 doses of a COVID-19 vaccine have been administered to people across Los Angeles County. Of these, 6,013,569 were first doses and 4,831,962 were second doses.

88% of L.A. County seniors 65 and over, 70% of residents 16 and over, and 69% of residents 12 and over have received one dose of a vaccine including 39% of L.A. County teens between the ages of 12 and 17. 

Of the nearly 10.3 million L.A. County residents, including those who are not yet eligible for the vaccine, 52% are fully vaccinated and 59% have received at least one dose.

“As more people have gotten vaccinated, the proportion of total cases that are among those vaccinated has also increased,” public health officials said. “This is to be expected because as more people are vaccinated, the number of fully vaccinated people becoming infected will increase.”

 In June, fully vaccinated people represented 20% of all cases diagnosed among L.A. County residents, while unvaccinated and partially vaccinated people accounted for 80% of cases.

Public Health estimates if the 52% of County residents that are fully vaccinated were not vaccinated, the number of new cases would perhaps be double because everyone would instead have the same risk of infection as unvaccinated people do. While County numbers have been going up, they would be much higher if there weren’t as many people fully vaccinated.

In Los Angeles County, everyone 2 years of age and older must wear a mask in all indoor public places, regardless of their vaccination status. 

“While the County does not require masking at private gatherings where unvaccinated or immunocompromised people are present, universal masking in these scenarios, particularly indoors, is the best way to protect everyone,” department officials said.

To find a vaccination site in Los Angeles County, visit here.

Note: This story has been updated with new case data from the Department of Public Health.

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Mask Mandate To Be Reinstated In L.A. County Amid COVID-19 Case Spike

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CDC Mask Guidelines

The Los Angeles County mask mandate is expected to be reinstated Saturday evening as COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations surge.

At 11:59 p.m. on July 17, the L.A. County Department of Public Health is set to once again require residents to wear face coverings in all indoor settings, regardless of vaccination status, according to Dr. Muntu Davis, the county health officer. 

“We’re not where we need to be for the millions at risk of infection here in Los Angeles County, and waiting to do something will be too late, given what we’re seeing,” Davis said Thursday.

Following the California reopening on June 15, the mask mandate was lifted for those fully vaccinated in most settings. 

Some exceptions will apply, similar to the masking order prior to full reopening, with more details set to be released this week, according to the department.

In the month since reopening, Public Health has reported a spike in the virus, with the past six days having over 1,000 new cases.

1,537 new coronavirus cases were confirmed on Thursday, an increase of over 80% from last week, according to the health officer.

“People are more likely to get infected and spread the virus when indoors, where the virus is transmitted through the air and concentrates,” department officials said. “Consistent and correct mask use by people indoors adds a layer of protection and can reduce the risk of COVID-19 and other respiratory infections.”

Further details on the modification of the L.A. County Health Officer order are expected to be released on Friday.

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