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Recall Of Governor Gavin Newsom Reaches Required Number Of Signatures

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Governor Gavin Newsom (1)

The recall of Governor Gavin Newsom has met the required number of signatures on Monday becoming closer to being on the ballot.

California Secretary of State Dr. Shirley N. Weber has announced that the threshold of verified signatures reported by counties across the state has been met, triggering the next phase of the recall process.

A 30-business-day period in which voters may submit written requests to county Registrars of Voters to remove their names from the recall petition has now started, according to Weber’s office.

The valid signatures in the 10th report are 1,626,042, which exceeds the total of 1,495,709 signatures required. Counties still have until April 29 to verify the validity of any remaining signatures, according to the Secretary of State’s office. 

Any voter who has signed the recall petition may provide a written request to their county elections official to have their signature removed from the petition between April 26 and June 8, according to the election code.

If after this period the recall election still has a sufficient number of signatures, the Department of Finance will have 30 business days to estimate the cost of the recall election, according to the Secretary of State’s office. 

Following that, the Joint Legislative Budget Committee will have 30 calendar days to review and comment on those estimates before the lieutenant governor sets the date for the recall election.

The recall election must be held between 60 and 80 days from the date the Secretary of State certifies that it has qualified.

Additional information about the recall process, including calendar information, may be found here.

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Governor Newsom Announces $12 Billion Plan To Confront Homelessness Crisis

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Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled a $12 billion plan to tackle the issue of homelessness, expected to be the largest investment of its kind in California history

This investment is set to provide 65,000 people with housing placements, more than 300,000 people with housing stability and create 46,000 new housing units, according to Newsom’s office. 

To build on the success of Project Homekey – a revolutionary program that provided safe shelter from COVID-19 to 36,000 Californians and created 6,000 affordable housing units in record time and at a fraction of the cost.

The plan includes a massive expansion of Homekey and other similar strategies to get housing up and running quickly, investing $8.75 billion to unlock at least 46,000 new homeless housing units and affordable apartments. The package focuses on those with the most acute needs, with at least 28,000 new beds and housing placements for clients with behavioral health needs and seniors at the highest risk of homelessness.

The Newsom Administration’s plan also comes with greater accountability and transparency measures, to make sure investments are put toward effective solutions and money is well-spent.

Under the California Comeback Plan, the state seeks to functionally end family homelessness within five years through a new $3.5 billion investment in homelessness prevention, rental support and new housing opportunities for people at risk of homelessness. 

To achieve this, the Newsom Administration is investing $1.85 billion in new housing for homeless families and $1.6 billion in rental support and homelessness prevention for families.

“Within a year, Homekey did more to address the homelessness and affordable housing crisis than anything that’s been done in decades and became a national model. Now is the time to double down on these successful efforts,” said Newsom in a statement. “The California Comeback Plan invests a historic $12 billion to expand these successful programs and seeks to end family homelessness within five years. That’s the idea behind the Comeback Plan’s homelessness investments – more, faster and with accountability and efficiency stitched into the fabric of these new investments.”

The California Comeback Plan includes almost $50 million in targeted programs and grants to local governments, to move people out of unsafe, unhealthy encampments and into safer, more stable housing.

Newsom’s plan aims to provide stable housing for thousands of vulnerable aged youth experiencing homelessness or at-risk of homelessness by targeting resources through Homekey and supporting various youth-focused grant programs. In addition, the plan calls for stricter enforcement measures of state housing law and investments into proven strategies, ensuring local governments are meeting targets to reduce homelessness.

The governor is proposing an additional $1.5 billion investment to clean public spaces near highways and transform public spaces through arts and cultural projects. The initiative is expected to create an estimated 15,000 jobs, including for people experiencing or exiting homelessness, at-risk youth, veterans and formerly incarcerated individuals.

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$600 ‘Golden State Stimulus’ Extended To Two-Thirds Of Californians

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Governor Gavin Newsom (1)

The $600 “Golden State Stimulus” has been extended to reach two-thirds of Californians on Monday as part of a $100 billion economic recovery package.

Governor Gavin Newsom announced the expansion of the program to middle-class residents making below $75,000 a year. Qualified families with dependents, including undocumented families, will also now be eligible for an additional $500, according to his office.

Newsom called the plan the “biggest state tax rebate in U.S. history.”

“We will take on our most persistent challenges – and start with immediate, direct relief to Californians,” the governor’s office said in a statement.

More than 2.5 million payments have already been received by lower-income residents, earning under $30,000, after the first program.

The new plan triples California’s previous investment, reaching more people and giving bigger benefits, according to the governor’s office.

On Sunday, Newsom asked lawmakers to increase spending for families, including funding for 100,000 new subsidized child care slots and home health care workers.

“We’re going to be making some bold investments, and some big investments, in particular, to support parents,” Newsom said in the video. “We have the backs of mothers and will be making investments to solve real problems and to acknowledge the extraordinary stress that so many moms, particularly working moms, have been under over this last year.”

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Governor Newsom Signs $6.2 Billion Tax Break For Businesses In San Fernando

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Governor Gavin Newsom (1)

Governor Gavin Newsom visited a sushi restaurant in San Fernando Thursday to sign a $6.2 billion tax break for businesses that have received a pandemic loan.

Newsom approved Assembly Bill 80 which aims to help businesses by not requiring businesses to pay state tax on Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans.

“This state is poised for a major comeback,” Newsom said. “We’re experiencing that comeback because of the small business leaders that persevered.”

The governor was joined by Senate Majority Leader Bob Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, as well as Valley native and “Machete” actor Danny Trejo at Hanzo Sushi to honor the signing of the legislation.

“Here in our own San Fernando Valley and across the state, small business is, in many ways, the soul of this state,” Hertzberg said. “It represents the hopes and dreams and sweat and toil that forms the foundation of our California Dream”

California businesses received over $97 billion from over 1 million loans, according to PPP data.

Some of these loans can be forgiven by the federal government if the businesses meet certain requirements, according to the Small Business Association. 

Under AB 80, businesses whose loans are forgiven are not required to pay taxes on that money as long as they can show a 25% reduction in profits for at least one quarter as a result of the pandemic. 

“Help is on the way in the form of a $6.2 billion tax cut, which will provide support, not to large publicly traded companies, but to the mom-and-pop businesses — the beauty salons, restaurants and dental offices — which have been resilient during this difficult time,” Newsom said. “This small business tax relief is exactly what is needed to keep businesses open so they can continue paying their employees.”

Newsom added the tax breaks are just a part of a larger effort by the state to respond to the economic fallout from the pandemic. 

In February, lawmakers reached a deal to approve the “Golden State Stimulus,” which provides over 5 million low-income Californians with $600 checks. The state also approved $2.5 billion in grants for small businesses.

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